The Importance of Teaching Responsibility to Children Living with Speech Difficulties


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Speech and language problems are commonplace in the approximately 1.5 million children in the USA that are on the autism spectrum according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). As parents, we inherently want what is best for our children, which includes teaching them responsibility and helping them to utilize their potential to the fullest. While taking responsibility does not come as naturally to children on the spectrum as it does to others but it is not an impossible feat. By simply being patient and following a few basic guidelines it can become exceedingly easier to teach a child with special needs a range of very important life skills that are conducive to self-improvement.

Speech and language problems are commonplace in the approximately 1.5 million children in the USA that are on the autism spectrum according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). As parents, we inherently want what is best for our children, which includes teaching them responsibility and helping them to utilize their potential to the fullest. While taking responsibility does not come as naturally to children on the spectrum as it does to others but it is not an impossible feat. By simply being patient and following a few basic guidelines it can become exceedingly easier to teach a child with special needs a range of very important life skills that are conducive to self-improvement.

Teach responsibility from early age

The earlier you start instilling a sense of responsibility in your children, the better. If you wait till your child is a teenager to teach them to be responsible, you are bound to be met with a ton of unnecessary resistance. While it is important to set expectations for your child, it is vital to play to their skill level. If you set your expectations too high you are bound to become frustrated while leaving your child feeling completely overwhelmed.  It may be tempting to offer rewards for good behavior and tasks completed but it won’t help your child learn responsibility. In most instances, praise or a star chart more than suffices in keeping a child on the spectrum motivated to accept responsibility.

Self-confidence encourages self-improvement

Children of varying abilities often lack the self-confidence needed to navigate through the various obstacles life throws at them. As children with speech problems often have increased difficulty in verbalizing their needs, they tend to lose confidence in their own abilities. As a parent, you are in a great position of power to help your child living with a speech concern develop a healthy self-esteem. One of the best ways to do this is to identify their strengths and offer praise when they do something well. You can boost a child’s confidence even further by discussing possible trying scenarios, preparing them for possible difficult situations that may arise.

Everyone can benefit from life skills

Children who experience difficulty with their speech may find it more difficult to practice self-improvement. As a parent it is essential to teach a variety of important life skills to a child, giving them the best chance possible to grow into a well-rounded adult. Apart from practical living skills which include using the internet, cooking, and handling money, skills that encourage self-improvement include those that revolve around social interaction and self-advocacy. Acquiring life skills is an ongoing process and should, like responsibility, be taught from as early an age as possible.

Making the effort to help your child reach their full potential is one of the greatest blessings to bestow upon them. Always remember though that all children are different and that it is as important to embrace and nurture their individuality as it is to teach them a range of useful life skills.

Source

Lucy Wyndham